Kay Jaybee : Journeys into the unknown

It’s great to welcome back Kay Jaybee, chatting about the final instalment in her Perfect Submissive series, and the importance of ‘location’ in creating tension in this gripping, kinky journey into the unknown. 

“Setting is vital to the tone of the individual books,” explains Kay. “For example, in The Fifth Floor, the very ordinariness of the business hotel highlights the unexpected situation in which Jess finds herself, exploring extraordinary sexual encounters. Meanwhile, in The Retreat, Jess is whisked from the Oxfordshire hotel into the isolation of a fairytale castle, hidden away in the Aberdeenshire countryside of Scotland. The very remoteness of the location—not to mention its picturesque serenity—adds weight to the sense that Jess is out of her depth and a long way from home. Her plight is worsened by the fact that she’s surrounded by such contrastingly beautiful geography.”Scottish castle

In Knowing Her Place, Kay takes us to various locations between Scotland and London, where the mundanity of each ‘is twisted to become titillatingly kinky’. Finally, with The New Room, location is condensed down to a single room. “One very special room… or, is it two…?” Kay adds.

Kay tells us, “I’ve loved dreaming up the trials and tribulations that Jess Sanders faced on her journey from everyday hotel booking clerk, to the Fables Hotel’s resident submissive in The Fifth Floor; her intense fairytale-style challenge in Scotland, during The Retreat, and her escape from Scotland back to the Fables Hotel, in Knowing Her Place.”

The New Room, a novella-length finale, takes Jess into one last adventure, and perhaps her biggest challenge yet.

Resident submissive of the Fables Hotels adult entertainment floor, Miss Jess Sanders, has been instructed to test out the new facility that her manageress, Mrs Peters, has designed for the sexual pleasure of her clients.

With a dungeon, Victorian study, medical bay, school room, and the daunting White Room already available for their guests, Jess can’t begin to imagine what lies behind the innocent-looking door to the fifth floor’s new room.

Under the supervision of the dominatrix, Miss Sarah, Jess steps into the new room and quickly discovers that she is about to experience far more than she bargained for…at freezing temperatures.

Feeling that she’s acting in a play to which everyone but her knows the script, the Fables’ perfect submissive is challenged to the limit

Kay tells us, “Of all the erotically-centred characters I’ve created over the years, Miss Jess Sanders has to my favourite female. (Male one? Well, that would be John from Not Her Type: Erotic Adventures with a Delivery Man).  Despite her submissive status—or perhaps because of it—Jess’ bravery is unending. She has more strength than many of the Doms she encounters. And although she is merely a figment of my imagination, I’m so proud of her determination never to fail: a determination she has to call upon once more in The New Room.”

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Throughout the Perfect Submissive collection, Kay has held onto two key principles: the submissive in any erotic situation should always have the choice to leave (a choice almost taken away from Jess, which forms the tension within book two—The Retreat); and the need for trust and respect between a submissive and their master or mistress.

Kay underlines, “One thing I haven’t insisted upon is that there should be a romantic element to these stories. That sex can be enjoyed for its own sake—providing all participants are willing—has been repeatedly overlooked in erotic fiction since the arrival of the pseudo-erotic Fifty Shades. I find this very sad. What’s wrong with reading a good book, driven by sexual feelings, providing it has a decent, plot-moving story, and is consensual throughout?”

However, Kay admits that, if you look closely, you’ll detect a relationship simmering throughout the first three books. “This wasn’t something I saw coming,” she reveals. “I certainly didn’t plan it. I wanted to write an intriguing series with sex at the centre, offering a tale of submissive and bondage encounters within a twisting plot line. Yet, by the time I wrote The New Room, the path of the story was all too clear. Without doubt, it’s an erotic romance—albeit one with plenty of ouch, tension and rope play. But who is getting romantic with whom? I’m off to ponder whether all erotica will, at some point, become a love story…”
If you’d like to read The New Room you can find it on…

Amazon UK and Amazon US
Amazon Australia and Amazon Canada
Barnes and Noble
ITunes UK
ITunes US
Kobo
Smashwords

Although The New Room can be enjoyed as a standalone erotic romance novella, it’s best thenewroom-FINALenjoyed after reading all of Miss Jess Sander’s adventures within the BDSM submissive trilogy: The Perfect SubmissiveThe Fifth Floor; The Retreat; and Knowing Her Place.

 

More about Kay

Kay Jaybee was named Best Erotica Writer of 2015 by the ETO

Kay received an honouree mention at the NLA Awards 2015 for excellence in BDSM writing.

Kay Jaybee has over 180 erotica publications including, The Perfect Submissive Trilogy; kayjaybee-_pic_in_blackThe Fifth Floor, The Retreat and Knowing Her Place (KJBooks, 2018), Making Him Wait (Sinful Press, 2018), Wednesday on Thursday, (KDP, 2017), The Collector (KDP, 2016), A Sticky Situation (Xcite, 2013), Digging Deep, (Xcite 2013), Take Control, (1001 NightsPress, 2014), and Not Her Type (1001 NightsPress), 2013.

 

Details of all her short stories and other publications can be found at www.kayjaybee.me.uk

You can follow Kay on –

Amazon,  Twitter,  Facebook, Goodreads, Bookbub, and The Brit Babes Site

 

Kay Jaybee : Why do we like to peep?

It’s great to welcome back Kay Jaybee, chatting about her newly re-released physiological erotic ménage, novel, The Voyeur.

Over to Kay, sharing her insight on why voyeurism is so popular.

“Why are so many of us turned on simply by watching other people taking sexual pleasure ,while we remain beyond the scope of their caress? Why do we enjoy reading and writing about people watching other people having sex?

The concept of ‘What the Butler Saw’ was hugely popular in Victorian Britain: a series of coversalacious tales and images based on male servants spying through keyholes, in hope of catching members of the family or staff having sex. This saucy imagery was at its most popular when the ‘butler’ caught a romp taking place between people of different classes; the lord and the maid, or the lady and the stable boy. In other words, the more illicit the liaison, the sexier it was to watch.

The observation of something that feels deliciously wrong, or that you’re not supposed to be seeing, lies at the heart of voyeurism. Of course, our concept of ‘wrong’ has changed through the ages, alongside our personal limits.

For many, voyeurism is about enjoying something we may fear, or be physically unable to do. We savour the experience second hand. In the privacy of our imagination, we may have complex sexual fantasies. They may feel incredible when acted out in our minds, but how many of us would want to experience those dreams in real life? If we were given the chance to watch a fantasy acted out, would we walk away, or choose to be an aroused fly on the wall?

Often, Voyeurism is also wrapped up with power. Ordering someone (or a group of people) to do what you tell them to do is a powerful aphrodisiac. Meanwhile, being the person commanded to carry out orders can be a huge turn on, if you relish more submissive sex. The dominant/submissive dynamic uses voyeurism frequently, with a Dom ordering his or her Sub to perform acts of sexual stimulation/submission for their visual fulfilment. If there’s compliance on all sides, this can be a succulent activity in which to engage, as well as observe or – for me – to write about.”

Wealthy business man and committed voyeur Mark Parker has thirteen fantasies he’s intent on turning into reality. Travelling between his London flat, his plush Oxfordshire mansion, and Discreet, his favourite S&M club, Mark realises his imaginatively dark desires, helped by two loyal members of his staff: personal assistant Anya Grant, and housekeeper Clara Hooper.

Upon the backs of his willing slaves, Mark has written out his fantasy list in thick red pen. Only Fantasy 12 awaits the tick of completion against their flesh before Mark’s ultimate fantasy – Fantasy 13 – can take place. Have the girls performed well enough to succeed in the final challenge? And what hold does Bridge’s Gentleman’s Club have over Mark? A place in which Anya once worked and was relieved to escape from. Mark’s girls must face some of the fantasies they thought they’d left behind, while Mark watches.

banner - voyeurDespite their slave status, Anya and Clara are intelligent professional women who’ve chosen employment with Mark Parker – the ultimate voyeur. In their six months of working for Mark, he’s barely touched them,  but boy has he watched them in action!

Mark Parker is driven by the sexual rush of power and control. He records each new sexual fantasy in his notebook, until it can be acted out by his willing submissives. However, there’s more to my novel that just a sexy list! As ‘The Voyeur’progresses, we learn that Anya was sworn to secrecy by Mark regarding his acquisition of her as his employee. For Fantasy 13 (the toughest challenge on Mark’s list) Clara must learn how Anya became Mark’s PA, and the secret of her previous job at the antiquated Bridge’s Gentleman’s Club.

If you’d like to discover how Clara became Mark’s second slave, and see how the girls cope with Mark’s extreme list of fantasies, you can buy The Voyeur from all good retailers, including…

Amazon UK
Amazon US
Amazon AU
Amazon CA

Barnes & Noble
iBooks UK
iBooks US
Kobo 

GooglePlay

 

More about Kay

Kay Jaybee was named Best Erotica Writer of 2015 by the ETO

Kay received an honouree mention at the NLA Awards 2015 for excellence in BDSM writing.

Kay Jaybee has over 180 erotica publications including, A Kink a Day- Book One (KJBooks,kayjaybee-_pic_in_black 2018), The Voyeur (Sinful Press, 2018), Knowing Her Place-Book 3: The Perfect Submissive Trilogy, (KJBooks, 2018),  The Retreat- Book2: The Perfect Submissive Trilogy(KJBooks, 2018), Making Him Wait (Sinful Press, 2018), The Fifth Floor- Book1; The Perfect Submissive Trilogy (KJBooks, 2017), Wednesday on Thursday, (KDP, 2017), The Collector (KDP, 2016), A Sticky Situation (Xcite, 2013), Digging Deep, (Xcite 2013), Take Control, (1001 NightsPress, 2014), and Not Her Type (1001 NightsPress), 2013.

Details of all her short stories and other publications can be found at www.kayjaybee.me.uk

You can follow Kay on –

Amazon,  Twitter,  Facebook, Goodreads  and The Brit Babes Site

Kay also writes contemporary romance and children’s picture books as Jenny Kane www.jennykane.co.uk  and historical fiction as Jennifer Ash www.jenniferash.co.uk

Dirty 30: a review

 

 

As Rose Caraway writes in her introduction to the ‘Dirty 30’ anthology: ‘There is power in erotic 51uoNnKDMtL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_storytelling. Our fantasies are infinite, and just as much a part of us as our arms and legs. Between identity and desire, we are complicated and beautiful and intense. And so is Erotica.’

It’s my pleasure to have a short story featured in ‘Dirty 30’: ‘The Honeymoon’ – telling of temptation and of relationships not being quite what they  appear. My own work often explores the darker side of desire, revealing what’s unconsciously hidden, or purposefully concealed.  Stories which play out similarly tend to make me smile and there are plenty of those in this collection: cleverly structured tales that offer a wry surprise and a bold twist at their conclusion…

Among my favourites are ‘Return of the Snow Queen’ by Tamsin Flowers, and Janine Ashbless’ ‘Sweet Hel Below’. I was in a swoon with both these tales, which play into my own love-affair with fairy tales, and with Norse mythology. Exquisitely told, and seriously seductive, both stories delve the struggle within us, between light and dark. Tamsin’s story, inspired by ‘The Snow Queen’ surveys the ease with which we are tempted (albeit within a world in which a sliver of magic mirror may distort our vision and lead us astray). Janine’s portrayal of  the Norse underworld is no less enchanting, exploring our fascination with mortality, and the dual nature we each harbour: of shadows, doubt and putrefaction, versus our vitality and capacity for self-sacrifice and love.

dirty 30 anthology janine ashbless

RA Goli’s ‘The Seer’ also draws on Norse mythology, using that rich seam of magical lore to explore universal truths: our desire to know what awaits us, and to understand what aspect of our frail humanity will bring us true contentment.

Sommer Marsden’s ‘Thunderclap’ and Malin James’ ‘Canvas’ also evoked a strong reaction from me, using gorgeous prose to delve emotional truths. In similarly sumptuous literary style is Brantwijn Serrah’s ‘Life Drawing 101’, and ‘A Polite Fiction’, by Terrance Aldon Shaw.

Meanwhile, Chase Morgan’s ‘Honey, I’m Home’, Elliot deLocke’s ‘Torrid Zone’, Sonni de Soto’s ‘Do Not Disturb’ and Michael Lewis’ ‘The Thief’ each use action and suspense to enhance their atmosphere of highly-charged eroticism.

And, I MUST mention Landon Dixon’s ‘Moby Tit’, and Spencer Dryden’s ‘The Dude’, which are both masterpieces in their own, unique style. Landon has skilfully woven his bawdy ballad of a man obsessed with breasts, while Spencer’s story, told anecdotally during  a radio phone-in, uses the brevity of dialogue to keep us hanging upon the turns of the tale, until the marvellous ‘punch-line’ of the ending.

Dirty 30 rose carawayIt’s always a delight to work with Rose, whose enthusiasm for our genre is inspirational and uplifting. I love her forthright attitude towards erotica, and sex! As an author and editor, Rose encourages us to read (and write) to liberate our sexual fantasies, to expand our self-knowledge, and to express ourselves without shame or inhibition.

Hooray for erotica!

As Rose says: ‘Erotica can be whatever we want it to be’.

The Dirty 30 anthology is incredibly diverse, well conceived and executed, and damned hot!

Time to discover your new favourites….

Find ‘Dirty 30’, published by Stupid Fish Productions, here

 

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Best Women’s Erotica (Volume 3)

It’s my pleasure to give a cheer for the release of Best Women’s Erotica Volume 3, in best women's erotica 3 rachel kramer bussel Emmanuelle de maupassantwhich I have a story, set in Rome, called ‘Through the Lens‘.

Pick up any of the books in the Best Women’s Erotica of the Year series, and you’ll find stories diverse and inventive and, foremost, hot!

However, those stories won’t just scratch an itch! By stealth, they’ll change you.

Erotica, at its best, has our brain performing a whole new Tango.

Best Women's Erotica teaser Emmanuelle de Maupassant - Cleis PressRead stories about women breaking conventions and refusing to conform to others’ expectations and you cannot help but feel empowered.  You cannot help but be changed.

In this anthology, you’ll find your own ‘scorchers’, of course, but you’ll also find stories to touch and inspire you.

My own ‘flaming chillies’ favourites include ‘Demon Purse‘ (I’ve just discovered an inner-demon-dominatrix fantasy – thank you Sommer Marsen!) and Annabel Joseph’s ‘Making It Feel Right‘ (I love stories which switch from where I first think they’re headed).

I adore Dee Blake’s ‘Bibliophile‘, whose protagonist is aroused not only by the reading of erotica, but by the physicality of the pages, and of the formation of the words. Her meeting with a writer of erotic fiction proves the perfect match for her own particular kink.

For their tenderness, in delving our uncertainty, fears and vulnerability,  Brandy Fox’s 512YDFWmS5LOverexposed‘ and ‘Watch Me Come Undone‘, by August McLaughlin, are especially moving.

Meanwhile, Lyla Sage’s ‘Romance and Drag‘ gives an interesting take on gender fluidity and how it can play into our sexuality.

What I love about the Best Women’s Erotica series, edited by Rachel Kramer Bussel, and published by Cleis Press, is that it encourages us to reassess our attitude towards sex, and to embrace our sexual fantasies, old and new. We see women navigating their way towards the sex they desire and emerging, as a result, with greater confidence.

Volume Three in the BWE series punches home this message more than ever before, showing us the many faces of desire, and emphasizing the validity of our choices. It encourages us to own our sexuality and to delight in it.

I’m raising my glass to that, every time!

 

Purchase your copy, here

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erotic fiction - Best Women's Erotica Volume 3

Janine Ashbless talks moral ambiguity, in ‘Prison of the Angels’

 

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You might already know that I’m a fan of Janine Ashbless. She’s one of our boldest, most inventive storytellers, blending elements of folktales, the magical and supernatural with erotic themes. As well as writing masterful short story fiction, Janine has created the Book of the Watchers trilogy, drawing on the Biblical theme of the angels cast from Heaven, and the eternal struggle ever after. Her themes are sweeping: the nature of good and evil, but also the nature of power and freedom, and our search for fulfilment.

Serious themes but, in Janine’s hands, the series is a supernatural thriller, ‘hot and frantic’. She explains, “The characters grapple with real problems of culpability, freedom, empathy and forgiveness.” Moreover, all the sexual relationships are complicated, purposefully ‘morally murky’, so that we, as readers, are obliged to draw our own conclusions, to decide for ourselves how we feel about each character’s actions.

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As Jacqueline Brocker writes in her review of In Bonds of the Earth (the second in the series), none of Janine’s characters are wholly sympathetic. In a tale exploring the battle between eternal forces, it’s the reader’s job to discern where good ends and evil begins. Except, of course, as in all of the most masterful of stories, there is no simple answer. We, being flawed ourselves, are in little position to judge.

Janine tells us, “My heroine Milja has to make a series of increasingly horrific and difficult choices following on from the first, momentous one: to free the fallen angel imprisoned by the Heavenly powers beneath her home. Milja is a nice (Orthodox) Christian girl, or at least she’d like to be. She has faith in a Good and Loving and Just God. But she can’t bring herself to accept that it’s fair or right that Azazel is bound in suffering and torment for thousands of years, whatever his crimes. So, against all the precepts of the Church and her family, she frees him … and then finds herself living with the consequences.”

“She’s motivated by compassion, right? Oh, and the fact that she’s fallen in love with this prisoner… which is not so laudable. But wait – you could see Milja as an abuser. (She does! She‘s guilty that she’s made sexual use of Azazel when he was powerless to resist.) But equally – as Egan, rival for her affections, points out – it’s also possible to make the case that Azazel has been grooming her from childhood, through her dreams.”

“Poor Milja spends the whole trilogy trying to pick her way through the dark moral maze of a supernatural war, without a light to show her the path ahead. Once you’ve rejected the dictum that “Whatever God decrees must by definition be right”, what are you left to fall back on? Your conscience? That’s far from infallible, especially when you’re young and in love, or incredibly ancient and physically superior to the entire human race.  Azazel kills without compunction – for him Might Makes Right, and he barely registers that inferior beings have any right to agency. Well, he learned that one off his Creator.”

PotA finalThe Prison of the Angels is the final novel in the Book of the Watchers trilogy: the story of a young woman who releases a fallen angel from centuries of imprisonment. Purchase directly from Sinful Press

or from the following retailers: Amazon US, Amazon UK, Google Play, and Kobo

 
Milja Petak’s world has fallen apart.

Her lover, the fallen angel Azazel, has cast her aside in rage and disgust. The other contender for her heart, the Catholic priest Egan Kansky, was surrendered back into the hands of the shadowy Vatican organization, Vidimus, after sustaining life-threatening injuries.

She has killed and she has betrayed. She is alone, homeless, and at the end of her tether – torn apart by guilt and the love she has lost. But neither Heaven nor its terrifying representatives on Earth have finished with Milja. Both of her lovers need her in order to further their very different plans, and both passionately need her, though they may try to deny it.

Milja is once again forced into a series of choices as she uncovers the secrets Heaven has been guarding for centuries. But this time it is not just her heart at stake, or even the fate of a fallen angel.

This time, the choices she make will change everything.

This time it’s the End of the World.

 

Praise for this series:cropped Angel

Book 1: Cover Him with Darkness

Book 2: In Bonds of the Earth

 

“An absolute must-read.” — Rose Caraway, The Sexy Librarian

“Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code, only much better written and with much more sexiness involved.” — Clitical

“Damn, if Dostoevsky wrote smolderingly hot erotica about fallen angels, he’d be Janine Ashbless.” — Samantha MacLeod

“The first two books of this series are smart, sexy, literate, gripping, and moving. I can’t wait for the third.” — Jaqueline Brocker

“Oh it’s incredible. I love this series and the final book is a masterpiece.” — Anna Sky, Sexy Little Pages

 

Janine Ashbless
Janine Ashbless, photographed by David Woolfall

Janine Ashbless is a writer of fantasy erotica and steamy romantic adventure – and that’s “fantasy” in the sense of swords ‘n’ sandals, contemporary paranormal, fairytale, and stories based on mythology and folklore.  She likes to write about magic and mystery, dangerous power dynamics, borderline terror, and the not-quite-human.

Janine has been seeing her books in print since 2000, and her novels and single-author collections now run into double figures. She’s also had numerous short stories published: by Black Lace, Nexus, Cleis Press, Ravenous Romance, Harlequin Spice, Storm Moon, Xcite, Mischief Books, and Ellora’s Cave, among others. She is co-editor of the nerd erotica anthology Geek Love.

Her work has been described as: “hardcore and literate” (Madeline Moore) and “vivid and tempestuous and dangerous, and bursting with sacrifice, death and love.”   (Portia Da Costa)

www.janineashbless.blogspot.com

www.janineashbless.com

Goodreads

Janine Ashbless Facebook

Amazon UK Author Page

Amazon US Author Page

 

Excerpt:

I was bootless and naked, almost knee-deep in a drift. I still had my panties in my right hand, but they seemed purposeless so I tossed them away with an uncomprehending laugh, starlight fizzling against my bare flesh. I shook out my hands and lifted my arms to the moon, feeling its glare lap me like a cold tongue. Every particle of my flesh was filled with its glow.

My hair unwound itself from its braid and spread out on the air, a dark cloud.

“Milja?” It was Egan’s voice, all resonance flattened by the snow. “Are you okay?”

“I’m just fine! Over here! Look at the aurora!”

He waded into sight between the small trees, looking around himself in confusion; up at the laden branches, down at his hands. “I can see every flake,” he said wonderingly. “I could see where you danced in the snow.” He finally caught sight of me properly. “Ah.”

I came to him through the snow, feeling the squeak of its compression beneath my bare soles. He was muffled up in all his outdoor gear, and I recognized my discarded clothes in his gloved hand.

“You’re not cold then?” he said faintly.

“I’m hot,” I giggled, pulling the garments out of his hand and dropping them aside, then catching his gloves and drawing them off to discard too. I put his hands on my waist so that he could share my body-heat; they felt cool to me.

“I can count your eyelashes,” he whispered. His pupils were hugely dilated, making his eyes look black and empty.

“I’m impressed,” I laughed, drawing his hand up to cup my bare breast, where it belonged. “My eyes aren’t even down there.”

He made a valiant effort to lift his gaze back to my face, but failed. He seemed hypnotized by the sight of my naked body, by the in-curve of my waist and the swell of my breasts. “Oh God. That mead was spiked. There was something in it—I don’t know what.”

“Angel blood.” I quivered as his fingertips found my erect nipple. “It’s made with blood.”

“What’s it doing to us?”

“Don’t worry.” I stretched up to brush my face against his, and the press of my body forced him to move his hands around to my back and my ass, skin gliding over skin, testing the slopes and curves like they were snow mounds he dare not deface. “Just enjoy.”

He made a broken noise in his throat, but his hands were everywhere.

I brushed my cheek against his, teasing his lips with the promise of my own. His frozen breath had formed a crust of rime on his stubbled jaw and I kissed it away.

“Milja.” The word was thick with desire. “Don’t.”

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Author Influences : Tabitha Rayne

 

Tabitha Rayne lives with three two-eyed cats and one single-eyed cat, in the country, where she has the joy and heartbreak of rescuing injured animals. She feels certain that, if more people read erotica, they’d ‘reach out to their fellow humans more readily and world peace would ensue…’ #EroticaForWorldPeace

She declares, “My main motivation for writing erotica is to turn my readers on, and make them feel good about that. I also love to explore the inner workings of my characters, by bringing in their sexual and sensual experience. They usually have an obstacle to overcome (like the world dying around them, or a sudden, life-changing injury). It’s their intimate, inner world which drives my work. My writing doesn’t always end in sex or climax, but I like to think it’s always erotically charged. Hooray for erotica! I think it can be overlooked in terms of exploring the human psyche.”

Tabitha adds, mischievously, “It’s not all about the fucking…  though of course, it can be…”

Music is a huge influence in Tabitha’s work. She reveals, “If I want to feel horny, to get in the mood for a big fuck scene, I put on Whole Lotta Love by Led Zepplin. God, that is a sexy song. Honestly, I could go on for hours about music. I go to see bands and concerts a lot and get so fired up. No musical genre is excluded, from country to classical, rap to rock, folk to jazz, dubstep and drum n bass – I love it all.”

“If I ever need to be transported I listen to Chopin’s Valse 64 ,” Tabitha adds. “Then there’s the dark sublime grind of Be Your Dog, by the Stooges; this gets me growling with energy and desire. Music gets me so high. Really, I can hardly bear it. I go for music that grabs me and keeps me pinned – so much so that I panic if someone wants to have a conversation while the track is playing. Led Zepplin, Peaches, Aphrodite, The White Stripes, Handel, Mozart’s  Queen of the Night – from The Magic Flute… chills!”

“I played The Wolf And I, by Oh Land, over and over while writing a werewolf shifter story situated in the animal section of the museum. It was a very visceral story, strongly featuring scent and sound.”

Dance, too, has shaped Tabitha’s writing. “I adore watching rhythmic gymnastics – and ice dancing,” she explains. “I’m absolutely in awe of what humans can do with their bodies. It thrills me – absolutely thrills me – I sometimes pirouette around my garden, as if I’m a ballerina. I’m delighted by the aesthetic of the body being put through physical paces. In my stories, I often refer to the sinews and muscles moving beneath skin. The flutter of a vein, the rise of the chest. The poise of a pointed toe.”

“I saw Mathew Bourne’s version of Swan Lake. It utterly blew me away – it was so raunchy and sexual – beautiful and raw. The males as the swans really brought out a darker, more vicious, side which was delicious.”

Game On by Jack Vettriano

Tabitha’s writing has also been inspired by her love of Surrealism, especially Dali. “I get quite emotional when standing in front of an original painting,” she admits. “I love the sensuality that comes from the power of one artist and a brush. I’m obsessed by the artist/muse dynamic too. It’s a theme I explore over and over. I love the way art can capture a moment in time – especially if that’s a sexual moment, such as Game On, by Jack Vettriano. It makes me think of the electric atmosphere between artist and muse. I wrote The Conference as an exploration of this idea. I met the artist once, and tried to woo an invitation to becoming one of his models… to no avail. I also love Egon Shiele – oh there’s too many! Mucha – oh Mucha drives me wild too.”

One of Tabitha’s favourite films is Wild At Heart, by David Lynch. “I love the energy, passion and sleaze of it. It’s gloriously odd and earthy and sexual – and Nick Cage and Laura Dern are fucking hot. I love how Lynch makes you aroused and disgusted in the same moment. The need to add repulsion and, at times, shame into my work, perhaps that came as a result of watching films like this.”

Tabitha names the film Secretary as an influence on her BDSM stories, saying, “Seeing it portrayed so beautifully on screen was wonderful; it made me feel more comfortable about writing those stories. My work often delves into emotional trauma or mental health issues and how sex (and exploring your sexuality) can help.”

Speaking of her literary influences, Tabitha tells us, “Toni Morrison changed me. She was the first writer, for me, to have sensuality woven throughout every sentence – making it a rich part of her work, rather than a separate thing. In my own writing, I try to keep all things sensual. Not just when I’m writing a sex scene. I like the whole piece to have an air of arousal, of something impending.”

A lover of poetry, Tabitha expounds on Edwin Morgan’s beautiful verse. “It’s so sensual – shockingly so at times. His poem, Strawberries, has me gasping. Finding eroticism in daily things delights me.”

An extract from Tabitha’s The Gamesman

She watched as he kept lifting up logs to split and throwing them onto the pile to his left. His limbs swung in that cocksure way of a person at ease in his own physicality. Beautifully lubricated joints working in perfect unity with the muscles and bones surrounding them. The flex and glide of flesh beneath clothing and muscle beneath flesh. She was actually salivating as her eyes skated across his torso, then his ass, taking in the shape of his peachy cheeks, oh how she’d love to run her hands round and down into the waistband, and cup those perfect globes, feeling for the dip at his hip when he thrusted.

He flung a split piece of log but instead of picking up another straight away, he turned and caught her staring once more.

“Like what you see eh, lassie?”

Taken from British Bad Boys – a boxed set of stories written by bestselling and award-winning British romance authors. No one knows British bad boys better than they do!

Purchase here

About Tabitha Rayne

Tabitha Rayne has been told she is quirky, lovely and kinky – not necessarily in that order or by the same person. She writes erotic romance and as long as there’s a love scene, she’ll explore any genre. She also has a passion for painting nudes.

Tabitha is the designer of Ruby Glow – pleasure for the seated lady, a hands-free sex toy made by Rocks Off. Her Ruby Glow was nominated as ‘Most Innovative New Product’ by Erotic Trade Only, last year, and came second in Good Housekeeping magazine’s Annual Vibrator Reviews.

She has also drawn up plans for a perpetual energy machine using inverted pendulums, and is in the process of designing a hamster wheel: ‘it will be better for their little backs and smoother, for less nocturnal noise annoyance… yes, I have a noisy hamster’.

Tabitha’s novels are with Beachwalk Press and her short stories are included in anthologies from Harper Collins Mischief, Cleis Press, Stormy Nights, Totally Bound, Xcite, Oysters & Chocolate, Ravenous Romance, Burning Books Press, Velvet Books and House of Erotica.

In 2016, Tabitha was named ‘best erotic author’ by Erotic Trade Only, and is a nominee again this year. Last year, she also won the ‘EuphOff’ – a marvellous competition to award parody erotica. In 2015 and 2016, she was named among the Top 100 sex bloggers, by Molly Moore.

Find a full list of Tabitha’s books  here  – including Her Stern Gentleman – a 1950s romp, set on a cruise liner.

Read more from Tabitha at www.TabithaRayne.com and www.thebritbabes.co.uk

Follow her:

on TwitterGoogle + or Facebook

To find out more about the Ruby Glow, click here

Author Influences : LN Bey

LN Bey was a reader of erotica long before taking up the pen to write debut novel Blue. Attracted to the ‘inherent illogicality of BDSM’, as LN puts it, ‘the desire to be beaten, controlled and humiliated (or to do the beating) despite it making no logical sense’, Blue is a quest story, with a darkly twisted heart.

LN is adamant that what we read and erotically fantasize doesn’t always bear reflection in what we’d want to experience in real life. In fiction, in our imagination, we’re free, if we choose, to embrace situations we’d find too extreme, too distasteful or, even, too disturbing, in reality.

Speaking of early influences, LN explains, “My interest in BDSM is innate. I found power differentials and half-undressed perils interesting long before I had any idea how sex actually worked. Among the earliest things I read that were overtly sexual, and thrilled me to my core, were a couple of stories in mainstream porn magazines from a friend’s parent’s or older brother’s collection, I forget exactly. One was in an early-1980s Hustler, I believe, and was a very odd thing to find there: a story about a fem-dom slave auction, a dominatrix on stage, one man after another brought out, hurt, and humiliated, before being sold. It certainly got my interest.”

AN RoquelaureMuch later, LN read Roquelaure’s Sleeping Beauty trilogy, then Réage’s Story of O, Antoniou’s Marketplace series and Weatherfield’s Carrie novels. LN explains, “Although the styles (and intentions) of these four women authors differ radically, they each have a definite sense of erotic cruelty—consensual, yes, but often ‘consensual non-consent’. It’s about how the characters deal with the system they’ve agreed to enter. There is love, or something like it, in these books, but desire, and the drive to keep going, to keep pushing oneself, is the bigger theme.”

As LN explains, these novels explore total ‘erotic fantasy’ immersion (in particular, into situations which would be too strict for anyone to seek out in reality). Rather than promoting the safe, sane, and consensual in fiction, these novels embrace extremes, so that the ‘fantasy’ exists firmly in the imagination, rather than being a fantasy which the reader might choose to act out.

“Sometimes referred to as ‘chateau porn’ (but what I’ve always called ‘institutional Pauline Réage History of O BDSM eroticaporn’),” says LN, “They’re full of wealthy people, and take place in worldwide organizations that trade and train voluntary sex slaves, or variants thereof: Roquelaure’s world is a conquering castle; Réage’s a more local wealthy club. We follow entry into a whole new world, not just a new relationship.”

The dedication in Blue reads: ‘…to the four women who have cost me countless hours of sleep but showed me how fun it could be to put entire worlds, and all the filthy things that go on within them, down on paper: Molly Weatherfield, Laura Antoniou, A. N. Roquelaure and Pauline Réage.’ It is these women writers who, foremost, inspire LN Bey’s erotic fiction writing although, amusingly, LN admits that the impulse to pen erotica was primarily triggered by an air-freshener commercial!

89598“A woman is seen busily cleaning her sleek Modernist house, in preparation for a dinner party,” LN explains. “The guests all show up, two couples, and I remember thinking it was a little odd that she was the fifth wheel in this; she had no partner. They all look around, so impressed with her house and the food, but, being an air freshener commercial, they start to sniff the air, and we see the dog on the sofa and the fish frying, and then they all look at her, very disapprovingly. She sort of hangs her head in shame. And every time I saw it I felt this wonderful little tension, because it was obvious, to me at least, that she was going to have to be punished…by the guests!”

“It was the first fiction I’d written since, maybe, high school and I didn’t intend to do anything with it; it was just a hot little fantasy. But it kept bugging me—would this happen, this situation? For it to actually play out, the scene would either be non-consensual, or there would be a reason for all this to happen. I kept thinking about it, and I decided she would have to be ‘in on it’ — she knew beforehand that she’d be punished for infractions, imperfections. It’s what she wanted.”

This became the opening scene of LN Bey’s Blue, where the banality of suburban life meets the seemingly contrary drama of BDSM ‘theatre’.

LN recalls that the first drafts were full of head-hopping and clichés. However, through reading more erotica, taking Rachel Kramer Bussel’s online writing class, and experimenting with short story fiction, LN began to gain confidence, and refine skills.

Precision is a focus for LN, who admires this in Kubrick’s work, where the ‘loving, longing gaze lingers over small details’. As LN notes, Kubrick lingers not only on objects but on people (often using people as objects in his films) and on their conversations.

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photography by Araki

Of the many erotic artists loved by LN, several are graphic novelists: Crepax, MichaelManning, Eric von Gotha, and Stanton. “These artists create entire worlds, where liberties can be taken with reality, practicality, and consent. I also love it when highly skilled painters apply themselves to erotically themed works. I adore Saturno Buttò. A painter named Roberto Negrón did a fantastic series on B&D behaviors, and there is the work of photographer Araki.”

ETHEREA III Saturno Butto
Work by Saturno Butto

Other authors admired by LN are Donna Tartt, Thomas Pynchon and Margaret Atwood. Of Pynchon, LN says, “I love the twisty, screwed-up quests, taking unexpected directions, with multiple plotlines. You travel with characters who only briefly cross paths or just miss each other. I love his willingness to have important characters drop out early, and the book is suddenly someone else’s story. Mysteries are slowly uncovered, or added, and his language is incredibly colourful and rhythmic.”

Speaking of Donna Tartt, LN admires her use of minutia to 2-1immerse the reader. “So much erotica seems to lacks detail until the sex scenes,” LN regrets, ‘As if they’re taking place on an empty stage with no setting.”

LN is a fan the ‘epic quest’, naming 2001: A Space Odyssey, Excalibur, and Apocalypse Now. “Episodic, segmented, linear but winding, they’re exhausting to the participants, and for the viewer, feeling as if we’ve been right there with them. In comedies such as The Blues Brothers Movie and It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, the quest explodes into absolute chaos. The latter has multiple quests taking place simultaneously, all inflicting insane, comic violence onto the world. What drives people to such extremes? The goals of these quests are all completely different; it’s the drive that fascinates me.”

“1970s erotic film rules my world: The Image, Story of O, the Tani Naomi films, and The Education of the Baroness. Cheap sexploitation movies,” LN declares. “There was a brief period, before the video format took over, in which ‘porn’ directors made sexually explicit, feature-length films with actual plots and some degree of characterization. They had budgets. They would, in their limited way, attempt to tackle issues: the psychologies of sexual power and submission, with varying degrees of consent (Tani Naomi films = 0 on that scale). They took chances! Considering how we can now find any filthy fetish recorded for the Internet, it’s amazing that such films aren’t made today.”

317fRIVTvWLRead my review of LN Bey’s Blue here

and purchase from Amazon

As her guests arrive for dinner, Janet is both fearful and aroused—because this is no ordinary suburban dinner party. Recently divorced and looking for something new, Janet definitely finds it when her friend Jon invites her to join an exclusive club of kinksters whose initiation is to be the host—and the entertainment.

Before the food is even served, she’s naked and on her knees, not to mention in over her head.

Kinky and sexy, intelligent and perceptive, Blue is both highly entertaining social satire and red hot erotica.

LN has written Blue from a position of knowledge, having been practicing BDSM for decades, in private. Meanwhile, in creating the group dynamics and small-group politics of the kink Scene, LN drew widely on the experiences of close acquaintances. “I’m interested in examining why some of us are attracted to dispensing or receiving the intense stimulations that others would call pain, or submitting our will and body to another (whether within the limits of safewords in real life or without them in erotica, porn, and fantasy).”

Blue’s protagonist, Janet, fears disapproval, and shunning — from her conservative family, her neighbours, and her co-workers. As LN admits, “These are the very things that keep me up at night. She fears being photographed, of there being a record of her perversion. I envy those who can be open about their kinks. Some of us simply cannot, which makes writing this kind of thing (or, rather, publishing this kind of thing) risky, though it is constantly surprising to me that, in this day and age, consensual habits still need to be kept secret.”

 

About LN Bey

LN has lived in various cities and towns throughout the American West and Midwest with spouse and pets in tow, pursuing various creative endeavours and playing interesting games. LN’s debut erotic novel Blue was released in 2016 and the three of five segments of the Villa series are now released. LN also appears in the following anthologies:

Best Bondage Erotica 2015, edited by Rachel Kramer Bussel

Love Slave: Sizzle, 2016, ed. by Dom Exel

No Safewords 2, 2017, ed. by Laura Antoniou.

 

Find LN at lnbey.com and at Viscontipress.com

On Twitter, Goodreads, and Amazon 

 

Blue, by LN Bey: a review

LN Bey was a reader of erotica long before taking up the pen, with particular attraction Pauline Réage History of O BDSM eroticato the inherent illogicality of BDSM — as LN puts it ‘the desire to be beaten, controlled and humiliated (or to do the beating) despite it making no logical sense’.

As a reader, LN embraced Molly Weatherfield, Laura Antoniou, AN Roquelaure and Pauline Réage, each with their own brand of erotic cruelty, of ‘consensual non-consent’, exploring systematized sex slavery.

AN RoquelaureAs LN explains, “In Story of O, in the Beauty trilogy, and in The Marketplace, the subs are there to serve and to lose themselves, not to be coddled before and after a spanking. It’s assumed that Masters are entitled to their slaves’ submission, and that’s what the submissives expect, and want, as well.”

317fRIVTvWLUnlike Story of O and the worlds of Antoniou, Weatherfield and Roquelaure, there are no castles or billionaire mansions in Blue, which is set in the blandest of American suburbs, where our cast of kinky suburbanites, each flawed and ego-centric, have day jobs, shop in supermarkets and battle traffic jams.

As LN explains, “I’m not a fan of overly romantic language, sweeping us along doe-eyed and swooning, with our hands clasped under our chins. I wanted to write realistically, taking what I most love about fantastical erotica and placing the scenarios into a believable setting.”

LN Bey, in Blue, presents characters each on their own quest for self-realization, usually through extremes of self-expression – through film, photography and performance, but also, as ‘artists’ of their identity, shaping themselves as living works of art (naturally, as works in continuous progress). The most obvious example of this is the character of Mai, who stands, in imitation of a statue, throughout the novel, decorating a niche of Carolyn’s home, but there are many others, less overt.

89598Blue references erotic art and fiction, creating a nod to the reader, in their role as ‘connoisseur’: we recognize ourselves in these characters who read erotica, peruse erotic art works, and indulge in sexual fantasy. Janet, the leading protagonist, begins her journey in just this way, with a collection of well-thumbed novels of ‘erotic peril’ and some coffee-table books of provocative images.

Janet engineers her entry into a fantasy, built upon expectations from her reading of sensational fiction (in this way, Blue is rather like a kinky, 21st century version of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey). Unsurprisingly, she is destined for disappointment, as reality fails to match her imagination (although there are elements of her experience that do appeal to her, and keep her coming back for more). Meanwhile, Janet’s fears must be overcome, in order for her to attain self-realization. LN tells us, “She isn’t looking for love but thrills, for her fantasies to come true, even if the book is largely about the impossibility of that. She knows how she wants to be treated now (‘strictly, but not callously’) and she’s suddenly got the opportunity she’s been looking for.”

Blue is about the artistry of pain, and control, and the struggle to fulfill yearning, to gain self-realization. Janet discovers, through her ‘quest’, that she craves being dominated, being compelled to serve and to take pain (despite disliking discomfort). She is a submissive, rather than a masochist, gaining pleasure from obedience rather than from the endorphin rush of pain itself.

Blue quote chapter 14In parallel, Carolyn, a dominant seemingly in control of everything around her, struggles to control her own emotions. LN tells us, “I modelled Carolyn’s crisis on the HAL 9000 character from Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey. An artificial intelligence-level computer, HAL was faced with two contradictory missions; unable to cope with conflicting impulses, as in Carolyn’s case, all hell broke loose.”

The most moving chapter in Blue is unveiled entirely through phone voice-mail, revealing Carolyn’s true feelings for her submissive.

LN comments, “I’m fond of alternative means of narration. That chapter shows us relics of communication, with a different timeline. We later learn that the voicemails weren’t even effective, because he wasn’t checking his messages. She was talking to no one.”

Some of the most vivid scenes in Blue evolve around hyper-stylized film-making, where Laura Antoniou The Marketplace BDSM eroticatension is heightened, since we, like Janet, have no idea what will happen next. Speaking of the inspiration behind these scenes, LN references director Kubrick’s ‘lingering’ shots and wide angles, and his tendency to shoot people as he would objects, examining them in minute detail.

As LN comments, “Blue is a book about erotica. About people who read erotica, and how we build expectations from reading it. One of the goals of the book is to subvert the expectations that the reader is likely to have about the story and characters, just as Janet’s expectations are constantly subverted.”

Purchase Blue from Amazon

As her guests arrive for dinner, Janet is both fearful and aroused—because this is no 317fRIVTvWLordinary suburban dinner party. Recently divorced and looking for something new, Janet definitely finds it when her friend Jon invites her to join an exclusive club of kinksters whose initiation is to be the host—and the entertainment.

Before the food is even served, she’s naked and on her knees, not to mention in over her head.

Kinky and sexy, intelligent and perceptive, Blue is both highly entertaining social satire and red hot erotica.

About LN Bey

LN has lived in various cities and towns throughout the American West and Midwest with spouse and pets in tow, pursuing various creative endeavours and playing interesting games.

LN’s debut erotic novel Blue was released in 2016 and the three of five segments of the Villa series are now released.

LN also appears in the following anthologies:

Best Bondage Erotica 2015, edited by Rachel Kramer Bussel

Love Slave: Sizzle, 2016, ed. by Dom Exel

No Safewords 2, 2017, ed. by Laura Antoniou.

 

Find LN at  lnbey.com and Viscontipress.com

On TwitterAmazon and Goodreads

 

 

 

Author Influences : Tamara Lush

 

Tamara Lush is a journalist with The Associated Press by day and an author by night, having graduated from Emerson College with a degree in broadcast journalism. The real-life events she reports on rarely end happily, which, she muses, may well have inspired her desire to write stories which do. Back in the summer of 2014, she felt drawn to creating a tale of love, which became Hot Shade: the story of a young reporter who meets a mysterious man while covering a plane crash on the beach.

Tamara’s latest release, Tell Me a Story, follows the path of Emma, a bookstore owner and TMAS-3D-bookwriter, who meets Caleb at a literary event in Orlando. Daringly, she begins to share with him readings of her erotic fiction. Both soon feel the effects, leading to an exploration of their own erotic fantasies.

The full five-part story is available from AMAZON (and currently on sale at 99p/99c). Also from iBooks,  Kobo and Barnes & Noble

Erica Jong’s Fear of Flying made a huge impression on Tamara as a teen in the 1980s. As she notes, “It showed me a world in which a woman can be a feminist and an unabashed lover of men.” While writing primarily in the romance genre, Tamara emphasizes her belief in the importance of exploring the intersection of lust and love, alongside the themes of trust and forgiveness.

Pathless Woods photo by Adam Larsen
Image by Adam Larsen

Speaking of a recent visit to The Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Tamara is full of admiration for artist Anne Patterson’s Pathless Woods installation, which comprises 8,472 satin ribbons, hung from the ceiling (24 miles of ribbon). She explains, “As visitors walk through, it’s as if they’re swimming in colour and fabric. Nature sounds play in the background and various lights shimmer and flicker in the darkened room. The streaming fabric is tactile and you can lose yourself wandering around.” She compares the experience to that of reading, in which we ‘enter an alternative dimension’. Tamara hopes her own writing offers this opportunity, to enter a place that is ‘sparkling and gorgeous and different from the everyday’.

She was a punk rocker as a teen and loved ‘harsh, loud noise’. “Sometimes I still do,” says Tamara, “But, lately, I’ve been drawn to ambient electronica, which I listen to while I write. I find that it captures a sensuality that I’m trying to convey in my books. I also love Italian opera and the bombastic drama that it conveys. I think I need more of that drama in my books!”

While Tamara writes protagonists that she hopes readers will identify with and root for, her own reading choices tend to run a little darker. She tells us, “I find it mentally intriguing to read about people I dislike.” On her bedside table of late have been Hakumi Murikami’s The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Renee Carlino’s Swear on This Life and Leah Konen’s The Romantics.

Tamara is also fascinated by the short story form, citing Stephen King’s The Langoliers as a great example of crafting a compelling tale in a shorter volume of words. For a spicy read, she recommends Cleis Press’ Best Women’s Erotica series.

71Uf8bOiB+L._UX250_About the author

Tamara lives on Florida’s Gulf Coast with her husband and two dogs. She loves vintage pulp fiction book covers, Sinatra-era jazz, 1980s fashion, tropical chill, kombucha, gin, tonic, beaches, iPhones, Art Deco, telenovellas, colouring books, street art, coconut anything, strong coffee and newspapers.

Despite working in the media, Tamara admits to rarely watching television or films. She admits, “It’s a joke among my friends that I haven’t seen any TV series since 2014, when I began writing fiction.” When she does indulge, she’s likely to choose a foreign film. However, having never seen the Disney films as a child, she has recently, at the age of 46, been discovering the magic, watching Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Her next film in the Disney Princess Project (as she’s calling it) is Cinderella.

Tamara was recently chosen as one of twenty-four authors for Amtrak’s writer’s residency, creating fiction while circling the United States by train.

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Find Tamara on GoodreadsTwitter and Facebook 

Or visit her website www.tamaralush.com

Tell-me-a-Story-print-FOR-WEB

 

 

Chatting with Janine Ashbless : Angels and Dragons

I’m so excited to be hosting Janine Ashbless today, introducing the second in her Book of IBotE coverthe Watchers trilogy: In Bonds of the Earth. It’s a thought-provoking and immersive novel, setting new standards for paranormal erotic romance.  Janine’s authorial style is unforgettable. She likes to write about magic, myth and mystery, dangerous power dynamics, borderline terror, and the not-quite-human. She takes exciting risks in her storytelling; she’s innovative, and she brings fierce intelligence to all she writes. 

Cleis Press released the first in Janine’s series, Cover Him With Darkness, in 2014, to  outstanding reviews. In Bonds of the Earth is published by Sinful Press and has just been launched.

What do serpents, or dragons, have to do with the angels who fell from God’s grace? Read on…

Screen Shot 2017-03-06 at 13.32.38“Stretching up into the great vertical space of the tower, they had become a living helix of light—a caduceus coiled about the pillar of the world. I thought of all the legends from across the Earth. I thought of the Garden of Eden and the Great Dragon of Saint John’s Revelation; stories bookending the whole of human history.

Oh dear God—was this what they looked like before they took human shape? Giant golden serpents? Winged snakes? Is this what angels are?” – In Bonds of the Earth

Janine tells us, “This is a little story about folklore and wonderful writers’ serendipity—the kind of thing that makes my heart sing, as a confirmed pantser.

I’m writing a trilogy of novels about fallen angels. In the first, Cover Him with Darkness, my heroine Milja releases the damned Azazel from his five-thousand year imprisonment, and I mention in passing that the angels only took human form in Genesis/prehistory, when they acquired mortal women as lovers (thus incurring heavenly wrath, the Flood and so on).

What did these angels look like (if anything) before they became human, then? Well, the answer is in the ancient Hebrew texts, if you dig down. The very word “Seraphim” means “the burning ones” and the word is used in the Old Testament to denote both angelic beings and poisonous serpents. In the Book of Enoch it’s interchangeable with the word for dragon.

Seraphim were, according to Shinan and Zakovitch, originally envisaged as winged snakes Screen Shot 2017-03-06 at 13.32.51with hands (remember that the Serpent of Eden is punished by being made to crawl in the dust, strongly suggested that it previously had other forms of locomotion).

So I went happily with that when filling in the details in the second book of my trilogy: In Bonds of the Earth. Now, my heroine Milja happens to be of Serbian ethnic origin, so I thought I’d have a poke round in Balkan folklore to find any specifically Serbian dragon lore.

And I came rapidly across the word zmaj (or zmey).

Zmaj are benevolent dragons with ram-like heads and winged, serpentine bodies, who protect the crops from the evil demons causing bad weather. Their blood is poisonous. They can change form and take on human aspect, and in this shape their obsessive interest is in getting into bed with human women. In fact, when thunderstorms threatened, Serbian peasants would go round the village and ritually chase the dragons away from young women in order to make them get on with their proper job!

Sons born of a Zmaj father and human mother are zmajeviti with shamanic spirit-walking powers. Many Slavic heroes both legendary and historical claimed descent from dragons.

These similarities with the fallen angels of Hebrew mythology, are—I assume—entirely coincidental. But they made me very excited and very happy! There’s an angel-child in my book and Milja knows just what to think. It all helps in adding depth to the story and to my characters.”

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More about the story

When Milja Petak released the fallen angel Azazel from five thousand years of imprisonment, she did it out of love and pity. She found herself in a passionate sexual relationship beyond her imagining and control – the beloved plaything of a dark and furious demon who takes what he wants, when he wants, and submits to no restraint. But what she hasn’t bargained on is being drawn into his plan to free all his incarcerated brothers and wage a war against the Powers of Heaven.

As Azazel drags Milja across the globe in search of his fellow rebel angels, Milja fights to hold her own in a situation where every decision has dire consequences. Pursued by the loyal Archangels, she is forced to make alliances with those she cannot trust: the mysterious Roshana Veisi, who has designs of her own upon Azazel; and Egan Kansky, special forces agent of the Vatican – the man who once saved then betrayed her, who loves her, and who will do anything he can to imprison Azazel for all eternity.

Torn every way by love, by conflicting loyalties and by her own passions, Milja finds that she too is changing – and that she must do things she could not previously have dreamt of in order to save those who matter to her.

IBotE coverBroad at the shoulders and lean at the hips, six foot-and-then-something of ropey muscle, he looks like a Spartan god who got lost in a thrift store. He moves like ink through water. And his eyes, when you get a good look at them, are silver. Not gray. Silver. You might take their inhuman shine for fancy contact lenses. Youd be wrong.” – In Bonds of the Earth

About Janine Ashbless

Janine’s books have been in print since 2000, with short stories published by Black Lace, Nexus, Cleis Press, Ravenous Romance, Harlequin Spice, Storm Moon, Xcite, Mischief Books, and Ellora’s Cave, among others. She is co-editor of the nerd erotica anthology ‘Geek Love’.

Born in Wales, Janine now lives in the North of England with her husband and two rescued greyhounds. She’s worked as a cleaner, library assistant, computer programmer, local government tree officer, and – for five years of muddy feet and shouting – as a full-time costumed Viking. Janine loves goatee beards, ancient ruins, minotaurs, trees, mummies, having her cake and eating it, and holidaying in countries with really bad public sewerage.

Her work has been described as:

“Hardcore and literate” (Madeline Moore) and “Vivid and tempestuous and dangerous, and bursting with sacrifice, death and love.” (Portia Da Costa)

Janine-Ashbless-photo credit David WoolfallLinks:

You may like to visit Janine’s website

Her blog 

Find her on Facebook

Or locate her on Sinful Press

Purchase In Bonds of the Earth from Amazon UK or Amazon US

From the Apple store or Kobo

Print copies from Sinful PressWaterstonesBarnes and Noble, and Amazon UK

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